• The Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE) AWARDED $200,000 GRANT

    Posted: December 19, 2012

    The Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE) is pleased to announce it has been awarded a $200,000 Roadmaps to Health community grant by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). The grant will support an initiative titled Hawai‘i Community and Schools Partnership Innovation by integrating community resources such as social support services, education and health care to improve learning and build stronger families on the Leeward Coast.

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  • Keiki Steps to Kindergarten Prepares Your Keiki for Success

    Posted: December 14, 2012

    Your child has no preschool experience and now it’s time for kindergarten … what do you do? INPEACE, the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture, is offering a three-week summer kindergarten transition program aimed at preparing keiki for kindergarten. The program is free and it benefits not just your child, but the whole family, and the school your child will attend. Keiki with no preschool, or very little preschool experience, are given first preference.

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  • A Fresh Start

    Posted: December 13, 2012

    Kūkuluao and Ka Lama Education Academy (KKLEA), an INPEACE (Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture) program, recently provided adults with a valuable opportunity to sharpen their basic math and English skills through a free refresher course held at the Kūkuluao classroom at the INPEACE offices in Wai‘anae. Nearly 40 people participated and though each one had a different reason for attending, they all had one goal in mind — to become more confident in their skills.

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  • Lā Wahi Hānai’s December Experience Promises Community Fun – and Learning!

    Posted: December 12, 2012 Kupu Ola Offers a Wide Variety of Agricultural and Sustainability Practices
    The Tender Green Bean plant produces pods that are meaty, tender, round and stringless – with an excellent flavor! There is a reason this bean has been around since 1925 and hasn't gone extinct! And, it will be the focus of this monthʻs Lā Wahi Hānai. Participants will learn how to grow this unique plant and discover the nourishment it offers. The planting process will be explained and demonstrated at the event. Share your respect for the ‘āina with your ʻohana.

    Join your neighbors from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary School. This month’s Lā Wahi Hānai, is scheduled for Saturday, December 15th. It begins with malama ‘āina (clean-up) and then moves on to wā a‘o (educational time). Dress comfortably and don’t forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, be sure to bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.

    December 15th, 2012
    8:00 -10:30 a.m.
    at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary
    89-778 Haleakala Ave. Wai‘anae, 96792

    Malama ‘Ᾱina - Clean-up
    Wā a‘o - Educational time
    Mea Kanu - Tender Green Beans

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  • From ‘Tongue of Fire’ To Sugar Snap Peas

    Posted: November 17, 2012

    Share your respect for the 'āina with your ʻohana and make it a monthly time to enjoy each other! Join your neighbors from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month. Lā Wahi Hānai begins with mālama 'āina (clean-up) and then moves on to wā a'o (educational time). Dress comfortably and don't forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, be sure to bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.

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  • From ‘Tongue of Fire’ To Sugar Snap Peas

    Posted: November 12, 2012

    Lā Wahi Hānai’s November Outing

    The “Tongue of Fire” plant is from the bean family, which is a wonderful source of complete protein. It was the focus of October’s Lā Wahi Hānai. Participants learned how to grow this unique plant and discover the nourishment it offers. The planting process was explained and demonstrated at the event. Share your respect for the ‘āina with your ʻohana.

    Join your neighbors from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary School. This month’s Lā Wahi Hānai, is scheduled for Saturday, November 17th. It begins with malama ‘āina (clean-up) and then moves on to wā a‘o (educational time). Dress comfortably and don’t forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, be sure to bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.


    November 17th, 2012
    8-10:30 a.m.
    at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary 89-778 Haleakala Ave. Wai‘anae, 96792


    Malama ‘Ᾱina - Clean-up
    Wā a‘o - Educational time
    Mea Kanu – Sugar Snap Peas

  • A Little Sweetness in November

    Posted: November 2, 2012

    Lā Wahi Hānai Plants Sugar Snap Peas

    A delicious, refreshing and slightly sweet snack or accompaniment to a meal, sugar snap peas are part of the legumes family. And, planting them is a snap, too! They also improve the nutrition of the soil in which they’re planted. During the November Lā Wahi Hānai outing, you’ll learn all about sugar snap peas. They’re only 60 calories to a cup, a good source of protein, fat free and cholesterol free. And, when they’re ready, you can eat them right off the vine. Sugar snap peas are relatively easy to grow, making them a good choice for a first-time gardener or a new garden plot.

    Join your neighbors from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary School. This month’s Lā Wahi Hānai, is scheduled for Saturday, November 17th. It begins with malama ‘āina (clean-up) and then moves on to wā a‘o (educational time). Dress comfortably and don’t forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, be sure to bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.
    November 17th, 2012
    8-10:30 a.m.
    at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary 89-778 Haleakala Ave. Wai‘anae, 96792


    Malama ‘Ᾱina - Clean-up
    Wā a‘o - Educational time
    Mea Kanu – Sugar Snap Peas

  • Lā Wahi Hānai Explores
    ‘Tongue of Fire’

    Posted: October 17, 2012

    The “Tongue of Fire” plant is from the bean family, which is a wonderful source of complete protein. It’s the focus of October’s Lā Wahi Hānai. During this month’s outing, you’ll learn how to grow this unique plant and discover the nourishment it offers.

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  • How to Plant your Tongue of Fire

    Posted: October 17, 2012

    This plant grows easily in a home garden, and the white bean with purple streaks is an excellent source of protein. These plants grow quickly and can be harvested in two months. You’ll see a sprout in eight to 10 days and mature plants are ready for harvesting when they’re between one and two feet tall, and the beans should be about three inches or larger in size.


    How to Grow:

    * Plant Tongue of Fire in an area that’s exposed to direct sunlight
    * Plant about 6 inches apart
    * Water daily
    * Mulch and weed if needed
    * Harvest when beans are ready

    Planting in a Pot:

    * Mix potting soil with Perlight and Organic Bone Meal
    * Fill soil to the first line of the pot
    * Make a hole with your finger about ½ inch deep
    * Place seed in the hole and cover with soil
    * Place pot where there’s lots of sun and water lightly (daily)

    Planting into the Ground:

    * Dig a hole about the same size as the potted Tongue of Fire * Squeeze the pot to loosen the soil and plant and slide it into the hole * Cover hole with the soil and gently compact * Water Daily

  • Lā Wahi Hānai Explores Soy Beans

    Posted: October 15, 2012

    Soy beans… they are a wonderful source of complete protein, and the focus of October’s Lā Wahi Hānai experience. You’ll learn about how the plant grows and the nourishment it brings your body. Share your respect for the ‘āina with your ʻohana and make it a monthly time to enjoy each other! Join your neighbors from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of the month at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary School. This month’s exchange, known as Lā Wahi Hānai, is scheduled for Saturday, October 20th. It begins with mālama ‘āina (clean-up) and then moves on to wā a‘o (educational time. Dress comfortably and don’t forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, be sure to bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.


    October 20th, 2012
    8-10:30 a.m.
    at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary 89-778 Haleakala Ave. Wai‘anae, 96792


    Malama ‘Ᾱina - Clean-up
    Wā a‘o - Educational time
    Mea Kanu – Soy Beans

  • Soy Bean – From Seed to Table

    Posted: October 5, 2012

    Planting, Caring for, Harvesting and Consuming Your Soy Beans

    Soy beans are healthy, high in protein and in fiber. The soy bean comes from a plant that grows easily and quickly in the garden or a pot. The mature plant is two-to-three feet tall and it will flower before the bean appears. The beans are green and fuzzy and will sprout in eight to ten days. They grow to be about two-to-three inches long. You should use a lattice or trellis for the plant to crawl up as it grows. Soy bean plants can be grown and harvested in less than three months.


    Planting in a Pot:

    * Mix organic potting soil with Perlight and Organic Bone Meal.
    * Place the Perlight and Organic Bone Meal mixture in a pot.
    * Make a one-inch deep hole and place a soy bean seed in it.
    * Cover the seed lightly.
    * Water daily

    Planting in the Ground (Transplanting from pot to ground)

    * Dig a hole the same size as your potted plant.
    * Squeeze potted plant to loosen the soil.
    * Place plant into the ground and cover with soil.
    * Water and weed daily.

    Consuming your Soy Beans:

    * Soy beans may be steamed or boiled.
    * Add them to salads, stir fry or eat them alone.

  • ONE OF A KIND HAWAIIAN LANGUAGE PROGRAM LAUNCHES

    Posted: September 5, 2012

    INPEACE Develops “Basic Hawaiian” Pilot for a New Generation of Learners

    Kapolei, Hawai‘i -- The Institute for Native Pacific Education & Culture (INPEACE) is proud to announce a $775,661.00 (3-year) grant to create a Web-based pilot project to transition Native Hawaiians from knowing hundreds of words, phrases, songs and chants to being able to converse in Hawaiian.

    “Basic Hawaiian will make learning to speak our language easy and fun,” said Dr. Kū Kahakalau, Program Director for the newly launched INPEACE project. “Using the latest in digital technology, our activities and lessons will be designed to involve the whole family or any group of learners, such as co-workers at Hawaiian organizations, or even students in a traditional classroom, who want to become speakers of Hawaiian.

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  • A "Conversation" about INPEACE

    Posted: September 4, 2012

    They’ve knocked on 4,000 doors since INPEACE’s newest innovative program, Hōʻala, began. Staff members are spreading the word that families have options and opportunities for their keiki when it comes to preschool.

    Dr. Kanoe Nāone, INPEACE’s Chief Executive Officer, described the Hōʻala and Parents as Teachers program, along with other INPEACE programs like Keiki Steps to co-hosts Beth-Ann Kozlovich and Chris Vandercook, on a recent segment of Hawaiʻi Public Radio’s morning show “The Conversation.”

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  • Get a Jump on Success

    Posted: August 10th, 2012

    There’s so much for you and your child to explore - together! Sign up for Keiki Steps, a program by INPEACE, which prepares you and your keiki for kindergarten. It’s a FREE parent-participation program designed to get your keiki ready for school and life.

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  • A Step Ahead

    Posted: August 8th, 2012

    Going to kindergarten is a major milestone in your child’s life. But, is your keiki ready? Have you done all you can to prepare your child for school? Pualani Murakami says preschool was just too expensive, so she decided to stay home and teach her daughter Kiley the things she would need to know before entering kindergarten. “I just kind of guessed on my own what curriculum in kindergarten would be,” Murakami says.

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  • Lā Wahi Hānai

    Posted: August 8, 2012

    In Hawai’i and especially on the Wai’anae Coast we show respect for the ‘āina. Please join us. Why not make it a family affair? Bring the ʻohana from 8 to 10:30 a.m. every third Saturday of each month. We’ll begin with malama ‘āina (clean-up) and then move on to wā a‘o (educational time). Come prepared: dress comfortably and don’t forget a hat, sunscreen, mosquito repellent, appropriate shoes and a water bottle. And, bring something from your home to share, perhaps papaya, mango, fish, kalo, a song or a story.

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  • A Big Step …for our Littlest Keiki

    Posted: 7-12-12

    Have you heard? It’s Keiki Steps pre-registration time! This FREE parent participation program prepares your child for Kindergarten while grounding them in culture and early learning knowledge. Sign up now, as the program fills up quickly! Pre-registration for the 2012-2013 school year is July 17 – 20, 23 and 24 at our O‘ahu and Hawai‘i Island sites.

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  • Reading is “FUN”damental with INPEACE’s Keiki Steps Program!

    May 19, 2012

    Getting ready for the first day of school is an exciting (and sometimes scary) time in a keiki’s life. It’s more than just a new experience, it’s a milestone and preparing for it can mean the difference between tears and a smile.


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  • Knock, Knock, Hui, Aloha!

    May 9, 2012

    When there’s a knock at the door from Kahe to Ka‘ena, it might just be a helpful group from INPEACE’s Hō‘ala program. Recently, Hō‘ala and Parents as Teachers (PAT) Program Director, Nalani Galariada, and Community Recruiters Carmelita Westbrook, Saydee Pojas and Malery DuPont, sat down with Billy V from 940, KINE and KCCN’s Nā ʻŌiwi ʻŌlino program to explain why they go door-to-door to inform parents on the Waiʻanae Coast about the many resources available to them and their keiki.

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  • Hōʻala Community Recruiters Knock on More than 3,000 Family Homes to Help Keiki Get a Good Start

    May 8, 2012

    Many families with children under the age of five may not know about the early learning programs available to them; and if they aren’t aware their children are missing out on valuable opportunities. For this reason, the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture (INPEACE) launched a new program last November called Hōʻala, aimed at empowering families with services and information to help improve outcomes for their children and prepare keiki for school success.

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  • Keiki Steps – ‘Ohana-Style

    May 7, 2012

    After the tragic loss of her husband to lung cancer, Wai‘anae resident Adela Cabacungan became a widow and a single mother all in one day. She and her children were facing a very uncertain future, but things began looking brighter when a friend told Cabacungan about INPEACE’s Keiki Steps program. “Keiki Steps was there for me when I needed support the most,” Cabacungan says.

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  • Keiki Steps to Kindergarten Prepares Your Keiki for Success

    May 5, 2012

    Your child has no preschool experience and now it’s time for kindergarten … what do you do? INPEACE, the Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture, is offering a three-week summer kindergarten transition program aimed at preparing keiki for kindergarten. The program is free and it benefits not just your child, but the whole family, and the school your child will attend. Keiki with no preschool, or very little preschool experience, are given first preference.

    Read More »

  • A Fresh Start

    May 3, 2012

    Kūkuluao and Ka Lama Education Academy (KKLEA), an INPEACE (Institute for Native Pacific Education and Culture) program, recently provided adults with a valuable opportunity to sharpen their basic math and English skills through a free refresher course held at the Kūkuluao classroom at the INPEACE offices in Wai‘anae. Nearly 40 people participated and though each one had a different reason for attending, they all had one goal in mind — to become more confident in their skills.

    Read More »

  • Early Kindergarten Registration Can Help Keiki Adjust to a New School

    May 2, 2012

    Is your child ready for kindergarten? Schools need to be ready, too. Often, families wait until right before school starts to register their keiki, leaving schools to scramble at the last minute to hire additional teachers, and making the transition to kindergarten hard on kids.

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  • Lā Wahi Hānai

    April 9, 2012

    Much of the world recognizes Earth Day during the month of April. But in Hawai‘i, every day is Earth Day! Native Hawaiians take great pride in respecting, protecting and maintaining the ‘Ᾱina. Join members of your community for Lā Wahi Hānai, a special clean up and educational experience, Saturday, April 9 at Kupu Ola Nānākuli Elementary School.

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  • INPEACE Wins "Best Places to Work in Hawai'i" for the Second Time

    February 12, 2012

    This year marks the second time that INPEACE has been recognized on the esteemed list of Hawai‘i Business “Best Places to Work”. The recognition was a result of an employee survey that showed a high level of overall satisfaction.


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  • Together, we can make a difference!

    March 28, 2012

    Mahalo to all the families and keiki who attended the early childhood rally at the State Capitol on March 20th. Over 300 INPEACE participants comprised the group of more than 1,000 keiki and their families who participated in the mock preschool and parent participation demonstration.


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